our projects

Research

Dysimmune Diseases Foundation (DDF) funds research into the cause, treatment, and cure for
autoimmune diseases.

Lars Bech
The compound IVIG, as seen through the microscopic lens with the addition of dyes.
Photo on Acrylic

New funding opportunity

Dysimmune Diseases Foundation (DDF) is proud to announce the first Young Investigator Research
Grant which will provide $75,000 to support autoimmune neuromuscular disease clinical research.
For more information, see the DDF Grants page.

CURRENT AND PROSPECTIVE RESEARCH

AUTOIMMUNE DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES

BULLOUS DISEASE

Bullous diseases are rare autoimmune disorders that cause painful blistering and erosion of the skin and mucous membranes. This group of diseases include bullous pemphigoid, dermatitis herpetiformis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, linear immunoglobulin A disease, mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigoid gestationis, pemphigus foliaceus, and pemphigus vulgaris. These diseases may be treated with corticosteroids, immunosuppressant agents, and IVIG. The supported research below discusses current and emerging treatment paradigms and associated risks and benefits.

SUPPORTED RESEARCH

Kaveri S, Ahmed AR. Reversing Autoimmunity: Combination of Rituximab and Intravenous Immunoglobulin. Frontiers in Immunology. (Front. Immunol. 9:1189. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2018.01189)

Yanovsky R, McLeod M, Ahmed AR. Treatment of pemphigus vulgaris: part 1 – current therapies. (Expert Review of Clinical Immunology. 2019;15:1047–1060)

Yanovsky R, McLeod M, Ahmed AR. Treatment of pemphigus vulgaris: part 2 – emerging therapies. (Expert Review of Clinical Immunology 2019;15:1061–1071)

Kridin K, Ahmed AR. Post-rituximab immunoglobulin M (IgM) hypogammaglobulinemia. (Autoimmunity Reviews. 2020 Mar;19(3):102466.
doi:10.1016/j.autrev.2020.102466)

Kridin K, Ahmed AR. Anti-p200 Pemphigoid: A Systematic Review. (Front. Immunol. 10:2466. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2019.02466)

Ongoing research

INFLAMMATORY NEUROPATHY WITH DIABETES MELLITUS (DM)

Finding the Efficacy of IVIG in Patients with Dysimmune Neuropathy and Diabetes (FIND-IVIG), an observational registry study

Distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common neuropathy to occur in diabetes mellitus (DM), but patients with DM can also develop inflammatory neuropathies, the most common of which is chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP).1 The amenability
of CIDP, an immune-mediated neuropathy, to treatment with immunoglobulin (IG), makes its identification important.1-3 There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the prevalence of CIDP tends to be higher in patients with DM.3 CIDP is the most treatable neuropathy that can occur with DM, and the rapidly progressive disability caused by CIDP and other inflammatory neuropathies warrants awareness among healthcare professionals of the potential benefit of immunomodulatory therapy in patients with such afflictions.1 There is a need for heightened awareness of inflammatory neuropathy associated with DM in order to promote earlier diagnosis and treatment with IVIG. The purpose of this observational study is to prospectively collect data related to responsiveness to IVIG treatment in patients with inflammatory/demyelinating neuropathies with DM, and compile and analyze clinical data against a comparator group of patients without DM.

Prospective Research

Finding the Efficacy of IVIG in Apparently Autoimmune Small Fiber Neuropathy (FIND-IVIG-aaSFN)
with Diabetes, an observational registry study

Peripheral neuropathy is a significant public health concern that affects nearly 40 million individuals in the United States 1 . Small fiber neuropathy (SFN) is the most common cause of neuropathic pain in peripheral neuropathies and may elicit debilitating pain in patients. 2 The etiology of SFN may be diverse and include autoimmune causation for a subset of patients. Whether this also extends to a subset of patients with diabetes is not fully explored. 3,4 Though limited data about the treatment of such patients exists, the reported efficacy of treatment of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) makes it clinically important to identify aaSFN patient subsets (i.e., those with an underlying autoimmune pathomechanism). 5 There is a need for heightened awareness of aaSFN patients among practicing neurologists to promote earlier diagnosis, identify autoimmune causes and consider the benefit of immunomodulatory therapies, including treatment with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). The purpose of this observational study is to prospectively collect data related to responsiveness to IVIG treatment in patients with aaSFN with diabetes or prediabetes, and compile and analyze clinical data against a comparator group of aaSFN patients without diabetes.